Welcome!

Welcome to the official website of the N/S Savannah Association, Inc. We are dedicated to preserving and protecting the N.S. Savannah, a non-functional one-of-a-kind nuclear cargo/passenger ship. The Savannah is presently located in the Port of Baltimore, Maryland, under a long-term layberth contract with Canton Marine Terminals.


MARAD Call for Comments on N.S. Savannah Disposition

The US Maritime Administration has a public call for comments on the future disposition of the N.S. Savannah. This is not yet a request for solid detailed proposals from interested organizations, as we understand it this is simply gauging public interest and sentiments. Right now what is needed is a great quantity of comments recommending she be saved as a museum ship, and perhaps why you feel that is the best future use of the ship. Please follow the directions to share your opinion here. Please share with your friends and do your part by submitting how you feel!


N.S. Savannah Enthusiasts Group

If you're not already a member, feel free to check out the new(ish) N.S. Savannah Enthusiasts Group on Facebook for commentary and information about the ship. Don't forget to like our page as well.


2020 COVID Update

2020 has been a bad year for those wanting to visit NS Savannah as COVID 19 has kept her completely inaccessible to the public. However, those who visited her during 2019 open houses had a very special treat indeed!

New Containment EntranceHere you see Frank “Skip” Litterer supervising visits to the inside of the reactor containment. This new entrance was created to provide safe access for workers during the reactor decommissioning process. From this location, all the major components of the nuclear power plant are visible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collision MatThis is a section of the of the collision mat and containment vessel shell that was removed. Starting from the left, you see the curved shell of the containment followed by a layer of concrete. Next comes alternating layers of steel and Redwood. As you can imagine, it was quite a job to cut this out, a diamond studded cable was used to make the cut.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neutron Shield TankHere you see the orange colored neutron shield water jacket which surrounds the reactor vessel. This picture was taken from where 2 circulating pump motors were located when the ship was in service. The motors and pump internals were removed during the ship's defueling in 1971, and reportedly given to the Tennessee Valley Authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upper ContainmentThis is a shot of the upper portion of the containment taken from the same spot as before. Note the heavy steel reinforcements of the shell, the containment was designed to contain the worst credible reactor accident. At top center is the cupula, the top of which could be opened for reactor fueling operations. Located directly behind the electrical panel (top center) are the control rod drive mechanisms

 

 

 

 

 

 


Membership and Donation Drive

Our Annual Membership and Donation Drive is in progress! If you would like to become a member and/or support us with a contribution, please join or donate today using our secure donation site or the printable form. Annual dues are $25.00 which helps with the preservation of the ship and promotion of onboard activities. To join, click here to visit our Membership and Donations Page. You can also make a donation without joining by clicking this button:


Visiting the N.S. Savannah

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) controls access to the N.S. Savannah and the ship is not currently open to the general public. However, MARAD's Savannah Technical Support (STS) group can grant access to the ship and provide escorted tours for groups and individuals. All visits and tour requests should be directed to the MARAD STS group. Please visit the MARAD website Frequently Asked Questions page for more information on arranging your tour. Click here for driving directions to the N.S. Savannah.

You can take a virtual tour of the ship right now at the Historic Naval Ships Association website's Tour of N.S. Savannah.